Care Center
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EMERGENCY CONTACT
INFORMATION:
Cincinnati: 513-530-0911 Contact Us
Dayton: 937-428-0911 Contact Us

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care?

Similar to an intensive care unit in a human hospital, Care Center’s critical care team oversees the care and treatment of our hospitalized patients. If your pet should become injured, or suddenly develop an acute, life threatening disease, he or she will need prompt emergency care, followed by hospitalization. In addition to needing initial emergency treatment, they may need to remain in the hospital for some time under close supervision to recover. During this time, critical monitoring and life support measures in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be needed. A vigilant team lead by a veterinarian who is specialty trained in emergency and critical care will improve the quality of care your pet receives during this crucial time.

What does the term Criticalist or Diplomate in Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care mean?

A veterinarian can be called a specialist after they have earned ‘Diplomate’ status, also known as ‘board certified’ in a particular medical field. Criticalists, or Diplomates of ACVECC are veterinarians who have pursued additional training specifically in emergency and critical care and who are dedicated to treating life-threatening conditions. After obtaining their veterinary degree, they undergo a minimum of 3 additional years of intense training in emergency medicine, surgery and critical care through completion of an American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC)-approved program. This intense program is referred to a "residency" in emergency and critical care and focuses on the most up-to-date techniques for diagnosis and treatment of life threatening disease processes in an emergency, and for the critical time while the animal is recovering. The emergency and critical care residency is supervised by mentors who have been through similar training and are, themselves, Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.

How do I know if my pet needs a specialist veterinarian in Emergency and Critical Care?

First, ask your veterinarian. Any pet that is seriously ill might benefit from this type of care. Animals that have sustained trauma or bite wounds are an obvious example, but a number of other problems are commonly treated. The following is a sampling of the type of patients that routinely benefit from care by an ACVECC Diplomate:

Trauma patients, including those hit by cars, bite, bullet, knife or burn injuries

Any animal that is having trouble breathing

Animals that need a blood transfusion

Any patient that is in shock (signs of shock can include weakness, pale mucous membranes in their mouth, cold extremities, and an abnormal heart rate)

Animals that are having trouble urinating, or are not producing urine

Dogs and cats that need specialized nutritional support because they are unwilling or unable to eat on their own

Animals in which an abnormal heart rhythm is causing problems

Animals with life-threatening neurologic disease such as coma or severe seizures that are not responding to medications

Patients that have had surgery and are not recovering well from anesthesia or are having trouble in the first few post-operative days

Critical Care

Ann Peruski, DVM, MS, DACVECC
Marlo Anderson, DVM, DACVECC

We are always open and our phones are answered 24 hours a day. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you suspect your pet is ill or if you have been referred by your family veterinarian.

Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care is a specialty that could save your pet's life. If your pet should become injured, or suddenly develop an acute, life threatening disease, he or she will need prompt emergency care. Beyond initial emergency treatment, they may need to be hospitalized in our intensive care unit (ICU) and be closely monitored around-the-clock by a team of medical professionals trained to care for those patients requiring this level of intervention. An experienced team, lead by a board-certified emergency and critical care veterinarian, will improve the quality of care your pet receives during this crucial time.

acvecc

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